Thursday, 8 December 2016

Her black singlet droops over her body and her yellow eyes light the dark night like a lamp. Wolf ears twitch to every sound she hears. Her skin is as white as snow. Her wolf tail whips through the air. A black hood hangs over her face to hide her mistaken features. But she only wears it out in public so people do not judge her.

A scar pierces through her eye like a dagger. She growls, teeth bared. Black hair with red tips sways in the wind like glad wrap floating in the air. White teeth rip through her victim's flesh, soon stained with blood.
Who knew that such a lovely looking person could be so dark,  so gloomy, so dangerous.

Wednesday, 2 November 2016

Hunger Games



My heart is pounding like it's
about to burst out of my chest.
I’m not ready for this I don't
even have a steady aim.
But it's only a game. In ten seconds
you have to find a place to hide.
I know where i'm going to hide.
My friend Carys begins to countdown from 5.
Carys, Gabby, Naima, Lily-Grace
and I reach for the smooth, stinky rubbish bin.
Gabbys lazer eyes bear into mine.
It puts me off.
“5… 4…” I'm not ready
and my legs are sore from
yesterday when I did yoga with the class.
“3… 2…” NO WAIT! “… 1”
The games have begun.
I pull my hand away from the blue the rubbish bin
and sprint as fast as I can across the field.
But I caught a glimpse of Carys running beside me.
I spot a big Fir tree.
Should I climb it? I decide to scramble up the tree.
The rough bark rubs against my hand.
Someone is trying to climb the tree with me.
I look down. There Carys is 3
branches down from me. I quickly grab a
pine-cone from my pocket ready to fire. But then she asks
“Alliance?”

I slowly nod my head. Well at least she will be a
human shield if someone tries to get us out.
We climb up the tree together.
When we find are comfy spot up the tree we crouch
down to keep hidden. After 10 minutes my
legs get saw and I can see Carys keeping the pain to herself.
After another 10 minutes two other
people walk under us.
Caitlyn and Emily.
We stay hushed. I think to myself.
We’ve never be so hushed before.
Carys sees me pull of a pine-cone from my pocket.
She shakes her head saying no.
Carys must be thinking that
Naima, Gabby and Lily-Grace are in an alliance together.
Someone spots us.
It’s Gabby. She points up at us.
Then comes running at us with handfuls with pine-cone.
Carys and I start climbing higher.
Gabby arrives at the bottom of the tree.
From up here she looks like a ant.
She starts to fire pine-cones up the tree.
But all of them miss us.
I quickly pull a pine-cone out of my pocket
and drop on Gabby head like a raindrop on a rainy day.
“You’re out!” I scream to her.
She pouts her lips,
slouches her body and walks off to the classroom.
We were the last ones to survive.
The bell rings.
That’s the end of one game.
I’m so relieved that's it’s over.
Carys and I walk across the field with our heads held high.

Tuesday, 11 October 2016

SCIENTIFIC INVESTIGATION: RUBBISH AT SCHOOL


We read an article about a fleet of research waka which spent two years criss crossing the Pacific ocean, observing rubbish. They noticed that if they found rubbish in the ocean, it usually meant they were getting close to land.  Because of this, we infer that most rubbish in the ocean comes from land.

We wondered if the rubbish in our playground might have a similar trend.   We decided, before lunch on Wednesday last week, to go and find out. We split the school into 12 sections on a map.  Each section had a group of scientists (us!) to make observations and inferences.

We put a red dot on the map wherever we found a piece of rubbish and collected all the rubbish. After lunch we went back, and noted with a blue dot, any new rubbish found in our area.  We also collected this rubbish.   This is our map, showing where we found rubbish, both times

We also classified the rubbish we found into types of rubbish and displayed this into this graph.  

Our observations and inferences:  

We observed that most of the red dot rubbish (rubbish found before lunch) was caught up in fences, around buildings and in bushes, especially tussock grass.

We think this might be because the wind has blown rubbish left on the ground by students into the bushes where it has been trapped.  The spikes on the bushes help to trap the rubbish.  Some children might hide their rubbish under buildings at lunchtimes. Some people might be throwing the rubbish over fences too.  Rubbish gets blown from the field into the ditch and can’t be blown out again.

The rubbish is spread throughout the school unevenly and mainly concentrated around buildings and rubbish bins.
We think this is because the rubbish blows out from the rubbish bins and under buildings. We could stop this by making signs that say ‘close the rubbish bins’ in bold letters or attaching string so that it will open wide enough so that they can put rubbish in the bins but also so it closes.

We think that plastic wrap is attracted to fences because it is light and  the wind carries the it and it gets stuck to the fences and it will easily blow out of  pockets and lunch boxes.
If you don't put your rubbish in your pockets instead you could put it straight in the bin and that way none of the rubbish will blow away and cause litter, and make our school cleaner.
Maybe the problem might be that there's not enough rubbish bins around the school; by some of the playgrounds, on the field and maybe we could put bins around the playgrounds. That will lower the amount of rubbish in our school.

We noticed that the blue dot rubbish was around the ditch and were the kids sit down for lunch.

The rubbish near the sitting area was mabey from lunch time and were the kids were sitting and the must of just drop their rubbish on the ground and not pick it up. The rubbish in the ditch was maybe from some of the rubbish around the sitting area (like light chip packets, plastic wrap, yogurt containers and snack wrappers) and was blown down to the ditch and trapped in the bushes and sandpits.

There may be some problems with our data. Some of the dots may not be accurate as it would be hard to get the rubbish exactly to scale. Some of the pieces of rubbish may have been missed and not written down therefore we don't have an exact fair test. The only time we looked for rubbish was the 27th July 2016 before and after lunch if we tested the rubbish every day we would have a much fair test.

We noticed that there was more rubbish at the playground before lunch than after lunch. The bigger the playground the more rubbish there is. In most of the playgrounds we found the rubbish next to each other What can we do about it? To solve this problem we can put our rubbish in the bins.

BUT WAIT, THERE’S MORE!

After we made these observations and inferences, we were left with questions as to why people in our school failed to put their rubbish in the bins! Why does so much end up back around the school after one break time? Maybe it is falling out of people's pockets? Perhaps it's the winds fault? Or maybe the students of Waimairi school are dropping it on purpose?

Since then, we have recorded how rubbish was dropped at morning tea and lunch. Basically, we spied on the school! We, as scientists, have completed an investigation into why rubbish is ending up on the ground. On Thursday the 18th of August, we went out at morning tea and lunchtime to make observations of you all, collecting data to find out how rubbish gets on the ground.

We split up into 12 groups. At morning tea we spread ourselves around the whole school to observe. At lunchtime we spread the 12 groups around the lunch eating areas and observed what happened to the rubbish.
We have made inferences from our observations and here is what we found:

MORNING TEA

At morning tea time, Waimairi school dropped 205 pieces of rubbish. That's 2 out of 5 people on average who dropped rubbish. 110 pieces of rubbish were dropped on purpose, which is more than half of the rubbish we observed being dropped. We also saw 46 pieces of rubbish dropped without the person realising that they had dropped it, often as they were walking.We also saw rubbish being dropped from pockets.

The places we found that rubbish had been dropped the most, were the Te Puna block, the walkway down to Ara Atu and the playground behind room 13. We think this might be because people playing in these areas may not understand why it is important to put rubbish in the bin. We also inferred that since there's big bushes at Ara Atu, people think they can hide their rubbish there.

Also, there is no rubbish bin in sight of the playground in these areas, so people lazily drop it instead. We think that most people do this because they think that they can hide it, or can get away with dropping it, even when they know it is wrong. And they do get away with it! Why don't people take a little walk over to the bin to put their rubbish where it belongs?

LUNCHTIME FINDINGS


At lunchtime, 219 pieces of rubbish were dropped throughout the school JUST during lunch eating time. That's 2 out of every 5 people in the school on average. that is a large amount of people to be dropping rubbish.
From what we saw, 79 pieces of rubbish were dropped on purpose, and 44 were left where people were eating.

Just like at morning tea time, we think that around the school most of the people drop the rubbish because there's not enough rubbish bins around. Although there are already some bins, there only a few, and sometimes not in the best places.
We also think that some children might not be able to reach the bins because we observed the bins are quite a bit taller than some junior children. Younger students also may not understand why it is bad to leave rubbish on the ground.

We could maybe get more and smaller bins to show others that bins are valued around the school but we think most of the kids already know about why we shouldn't  drop rubbish - because it will cause lots of problems for the animals in our environment and make our school look messy.

We spotted some differences between Morning Tea and Lunchtime. At lunch-eating time, more pieces of rubbish were dropped than the whole of morning tea time, even though morning tea is longer than lunch eating time. We think that more rubbish was dropped at lunch because more food is eaten at lunchtime and there would be a bigger chance of rubbish flying out of their lunchboxes. Lunch food is also more likely to have wrappers. However we also inferred that people might deliberately litter so that they don’t get in trouble for walking to the bin - as we are not allowed to stand up during lunch eating time.

Under the classroom is also a common place to put rubbish. But the reason  that people drop rubbish there is because they think no one will notice. But we did! But if you think that you get away with it, then you are wrong because we see rubbish everywhere, even in sneaky places where people will think you can't see it.

Overall, 424 pieces of rubbish were dropped in the 45 minutes we were observing that day. That’s almost one piece of rubbish per person. If nobody ever picks this rubbish up, then by the end of the week there would be 2120 pieces of rubbish floating around the school.  Many people dropped their rubbish on purpose, but also accidentally, leaving it where they ate or hiding it.

We think if we all work together our school can be cleaner by just simply walking  to the bin, because just doing a simple thing like that will help to make a big difference. But we also think that during lunch eating time we should be allowed to stand up to walk to the bin to put our rubbish in it. We will be discussing this with the teachers. This means people will be less likely to throw it in the bushes, under the buildings, leave it where they were eating or just throw it on the ground.

We also plan to write to the board of trustees to see if we can have more bins built permanently into the areas that we’ve observed to gather the most rubbish. We also need bins that are the right size for younger kids as well.

So what is the most important thing for you to remember from today? Do not drop rubbish on purpose. It’s pretty simple.  Please walk the few metres to the bins, otherwise we will all be swimming in a pool of rubbish.

We read an article about a fleet of research waka which spent two years criss crossing the Pacific ocean, observing rubbish. They noticed that if they found rubbish in the ocean, it usually meant they were getting close to land.  Because of this, we infer that most rubbish in the ocean comes from land.

We wondered if the rubbish in our playground might have a similar trend.   We decided, before lunch on Wednesday last week, to go and find out. We split the school into 12 sections on a map.  Each section had a group of scientists (us!) to make observations and inferences.

We put a red dot on the map wherever we found a piece of rubbish and collected all the rubbish. After lunch we went back, and noted with a blue dot, any new rubbish found in our area.  We also collected this rubbish.   This is our map, showing where we found rubbish, both times


We also classified the rubbish we found into types of rubbish and displayed this into this graph.  

Our observations and inferences:  

We observed that most of the red dot rubbish (rubbish found before lunch) was caught up in fences, around buildings and in bushes, especially tussock grass.

We think this might be because the wind has blown rubbish left on the ground by students into the bushes where it has been trapped.  The spikes on the bushes help to trap the rubbish.  Some children might hide their rubbish under buildings at lunchtimes. Some people might be throwing the rubbish over fences too.  Rubbish gets blown from the field into the ditch and can’t be blown out again.

The rubbish is spread throughout the school unevenly and mainly concentrated around buildings and rubbish bins.
We think this is because the rubbish blows out from the rubbish bins and under buildings. We could stop this by making signs that say ‘close the rubbish bins’ in bold letters or attaching string so that it will open wide enough so that they can put rubbish in the bins but also so it closes.

We think that plastic wrap is attracted to fences because it is light and  the wind carries the it and it gets stuck to the fences and it will easily blow out of  pockets and lunch boxes.
If you don't put your rubbish in your pockets instead you could put it straight in the bin and that way none of the rubbish will blow away and cause litter, and make our school cleaner.
Maybe the problem might be that there's not enough rubbish bins around the school; by some of the playgrounds, on the field and maybe we could put bins around the playgrounds. That will lower the amount of rubbish in our school.


We noticed that the blue dot rubbish was around the ditch and were the kids sit down for lunch.

The rubbish near the sitting area was mabey from lunch time and were the kids were sitting and the must of just drop their rubbish on the ground and not pick it up. The rubbish in the ditch was maybe from some of the rubbish around the sitting area (like light chip packets, plastic wrap, yogurt containers and snack wrappers) and was blown down to the ditch and trapped in the bushes and sandpits.

There may be some problems with our data. Some of the dots may not be accurate as it would be hard to get the rubbish exactly to scale. Some of the pieces of rubbish may have been missed and not written down therefore we don't have an exact fair test. The only time we looked for rubbish was the 27th July 2016 before and after lunch if we tested the rubbish every day we would have a much fair test.

We noticed that there was more rubbish at the playground before lunch than after lunch. The bigger the playground the more rubbish there is. In most of the playgrounds we found the rubbish next to each other What can we do about it? To solve this problem we can put our rubbish in the bins.

BUT WAIT, THERE’S MORE!

After we made these observations and inferences, we were left with questions as to why people in our school failed to put their rubbish in the bins! Why does so much end up back around the school after one break time? Maybe it is falling out of people's pockets? Perhaps it's the winds fault? Or maybe the students of Waimairi school are dropping it on purpose?

Since then, we have recorded how rubbish was dropped at morning tea and lunch. Basically, we spied on the school! We, as scientists, have completed an investigation into why rubbish is ending up on the ground. On Thursday the 18th of August, we went out at morning tea and lunchtime to make observations of you all, collecting data to find out how rubbish gets on the ground.

We split up into 12 groups. At morning tea we spread ourselves around the whole school to observe. At lunchtime we spread the 12 groups around the lunch eating areas and observed what happened to the rubbish.
We have made inferences from our observations and here is what we found:


MORNING TEA

At morning tea time, Waimairi school dropped 205 pieces of rubbish. That's 2 out of 5 people on average who dropped rubbish. 110 pieces of rubbish were dropped on purpose, which is more than half of the rubbish we observed being dropped. We also saw 46 pieces of rubbish dropped without the person realising that they had dropped it, often as they were walking.We also saw rubbish being dropped from pockets.

The places we found that rubbish had been dropped the most, were the Te Puna block, the walkway down to Ara Atu and the playground behind room 13. We think this might be because people playing in these areas may not understand why it is important to put rubbish in the bin. We also inferred that since there's big bushes at Ara Atu, people think they can hide their rubbish there.

Also, there is no rubbish bin in sight of the playground in these areas, so people lazily drop it instead. We think that most people do this because they think that they can hide it, or can get away with dropping it, even when they know it is wrong. And they do get away with it! Why don't people take a little walk over to the bin to put their rubbish where it belongs?


LUNCHTIME FINDINGS


At lunchtime, 219 pieces of rubbish were dropped throughout the school JUST during lunch eating time. That's 2 out of every 5 people in the school on average. that is a large amount of people to be dropping rubbish.
From what we saw, 79 pieces of rubbish were dropped on purpose, and 44 were left where people were eating.

Just like at morning tea time, we think that around the school most of the people drop the rubbish because there's not enough rubbish bins around. Although there are already some bins, there only a few, and sometimes not in the best places.
We also think that some children might not be able to reach the bins because we observed the bins are quite a bit taller than some junior children. Younger students also may not understand why it is bad to leave rubbish on the ground.

We could maybe get more and smaller bins to show others that bins are valued around the school but we think most of the kids already know about why we shouldn't  drop rubbish - because it will cause lots of problems for the animals in our environment and make our school look messy.

We spotted some differences between Morning Tea and Lunchtime. At lunch-eating time, more pieces of rubbish were dropped than the whole of morning tea time, even though morning tea is longer than lunch eating time. We think that more rubbish was dropped at lunch because more food is eaten at lunchtime and there would be a bigger chance of rubbish flying out of their lunchboxes. Lunch food is also more likely to have wrappers. However we also inferred that people might deliberately litter so that they don’t get in trouble for walking to the bin - as we are not allowed to stand up during lunch eating time.

Under the classroom is also a common place to put rubbish. But the reason  that people drop rubbish there is because they think no one will notice. But we did! But if you think that you get away with it, then you are wrong because we see rubbish everywhere, even in sneaky places where people will think you can't see it.

Overall, 424 pieces of rubbish were dropped in the 45 minutes we were observing that day. That’s almost one piece of rubbish per person. If nobody ever picks this rubbish up, then by the end of the week there would be 2120 pieces of rubbish floating around the school.  Many people dropped their rubbish on purpose, but also accidentally, leaving it where they ate or hiding it.

We think if we all work together our school can be cleaner by just simply walking  to the bin, because just doing a simple thing like that will help to make a big difference. But we also think that during lunch eating time we should be allowed to stand up to walk to the bin to put our rubbish in it. We will be discussing this with the teachers. This means people will be less likely to throw it in the bushes, under the buildings, leave it where they were eating or just throw it on the ground.

We also plan to write to the board of trustees to see if we can have more bins built permanently into the areas that we’ve observed to gather the most rubbish. We also need bins that are the right size for younger kids as well.

So what is the most important thing for you to remember from today? Do not drop rubbish on purpose. It’s pretty simple.  Please walk the few metres to the bins, otherwise we will all be swimming in a pool of rubbish.

Tuesday, 20 September 2016

My speech 2016

This term I did my speech  about how kids should not be able to watch horror movies. I was learning about the punctuation and the structure of my speech. I think i did good because I used many language devices. For example: rhetorical question when i said “Have you ever watched a horror movie?”and I used  power of three R13 R16 R18 and vivid verbs and more. My speech is well organized showing connections and flow between all important parts of speech structure and many ideas connect to my point of view.   I think I did well presenting my speech because after  I did my speech I felt proud. 

Here's my speech. You can listen or read it.

Have you ever watch a horror movie? Did you freak out? Or have you experienced a four year old staying up all night thinking there’s a monster under their bed? Or you’re having a sleepover and you think you friend is possessed just because she or he is sleep talking. Well horror movie has a rating on them. R13 R16 R18. the bad thing is that some kids parents let their kids watch these movies. I don't think kids should be able to watch adults movies especially horror movies. Well yeah, some kids can watch horror movies without having any sort of fear. But letting a four year old watch them that’s not very good.
Picture this. You’re in the dark lounge. When the gloomy movie ends you’re shaking, your face is paill. You're freaking out. Your mum tells you that's way past your bedtime(typically parents) your mum kisses you goodnight and tells you to have good dreams. Good dreams how am i going to have good dreams? You think to yourself. You're trying to stay awake but your just so tired from staying up. Eventually you doze off to sleep. You slowly open you eyes to find your surrounded by creepy clowns, bony skeletons and rotting zombies. Then when you're about to get hurt you wake up. But your thinking the monsters are in your room. Or you are sitting down with a friend watching a horror movie. You're watching very closely. In the movie there's a girl walking through the forest where the mist floats through the branches of big oak trees. The girl hears anonymous music playing and can hear the decaying leaves crackling underneath her feet. Suddenly boo you got jump scared. Or another time you were sitting down watch a horror movie. Suddenly smack and bloody hand hits the window. Or maybe you could see someone getting murdered and blood splatters everywhere. To stop this kids need to think if they really want nightmares and not be able to get to sleep. Or maybe when you put on the movie there should be a message for kids to be careful watching horror movies. Or maybe the movie makers should be more strict about these movies. Some movies are R13 but the can still be very scary. The movie makers have made a good effort for kids not to watch horror movie but they need to make it more clear. I think this is a good lesson because if adults let the kids watch these movies then it could change a child's perspective on the world. I think  kids should not be able to watch horror movies because they are R13 R16 and R18. next time when you're about to watch a horror movie think about all the jumpscares, all the 
gruesome gore and all the nightmares that will keep you up at night. And stop. 

Thursday, 18 February 2016

Where is my happy place?


Where the cicadas call 
for their long lost loves.

Where the wind howls to me 
and tries to run for the hills.

Where the horses try to say “hi” to me 
but I can’t understand their mutters.

Where the grass tries to shake off the mud 
in the trodden paddock.

Where the trees try to give me a bear hug 
when we ride through the orchard.

My happy place invites me in
to have a good time horse riding.





Tuesday, 2 February 2016

The Stormy Night

The stormy night.
Chapter 1 - The storm

It was a stormy night and the boat was rocking side to side.  I was sitting
 up in bed thinking that the storm will go away but instead the boat was trying to tip. 
I could hear the waves crashing against the rocks and thunder roaring.
I was hoping that the storm would stop so I closed my eyes then I went to sleep.
When it was morning, the water was calm and I could not hear any roaring thunder or any waves crashing against rocks, nothing. There was a was deadly silence.

There is more coming....

Tuesday, 17 November 2015

DISCOVERY

Term 4 
DISCOVERY
18.11.15
Today I made my mindful jar. I was focusing on thinking by asking questions. I asked some questions on how to make it better by saying “Hey how can I make this better looking?” 
And they replied by saying “Maybe you can improve by adding a little bit more glitter” 
I think my writing is unistructural because I gave one example of a question I asked.

My mineful jar.